Saturday, February 23, 2013

Via Climate Progress: Dust Bowl Days

Posted: 23 Feb 2013 08:33 AM PST
NOAA's latest seasonal drought outlook projects historic drought will persist.
By Lauren Morello and Andrew Freedman via Climate Central. See also the NY Times piece, “Thin Snowpack in West Signals Summer of Drought


Time is running out to avert a third summer of drought in much of the High Plains, West and Southwest, federal officials warned Thursday.

Without repeated, significant bouts of heavy snow and rain in the remaining days of winter, a large part of the country will face serious water supply shortages this spring and summer, when temperatures are hotter and average precipitation is normally low.

The drought already ranks as the worst, in terms of severity and geographic extent, since the 1950s. Though it’s not over yet, its economic impact appears to be severe, said Brad Rippey, a meteorologist at the Agriculture Department’s Office of the Chief Economist.

It “will probably end up being a top-five disaster event” on the government’s ranking of the costliest weather events of the past three decades, he said at a Capitol Hill briefing Thursday.

There is little relief predicted in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) latest three-month drought outlook, which the agency released Thursday. Federal forecasters predict that drought will persist in the Rocky Mountain and Plains states, expand throughout northern and southern California and return to most of Texas, a state that has been mired in drought since 2011.
NOAA does forecast improvements in drought conditions in the Upper Midwest and Southeast, areas that have received beneficial precipitation in recent weeks.

“The next couple of months will kind of determine how the spring and summer plays out in that part of the country,” said Jake Crouch, a climate scientist at NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. Crouch said that continued drought conditions could threaten water supplies in many areas, particularly in the Southwest.

Dwindling Water Supplies

With drought extending into its second or even third year in some areas, the main concerns are shifting from agriculture and recreation to water supplies as rivers run dry and reservoirs shrink.
Speaking at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Boston on Feb. 15, Texas state climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon said water managers are especially concerned about the situation in West Texas, where emergency conservation plans have gone into effect as water supplies dwindle.

In the western U.S., low mountain snowpack is once again a concern, especially in portions of Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming that feed the Platte and Arkansas rivers, said Mike Strobel of USDA’s National Resources Conservation Service.


Western mountain snowpack compared to average. (Credit: USDA)
“We’ve got the same trend we had last year,” Strobel said. “But prior to last year, we had very good snowpack, so there was a lot of moisture in reservoirs and soil” when drought conditions hit. This year, reservoirs are running low and soils are dry, which could magnify the impact of a winter without much snow buildup.

In Colorado, where 100 percent of the state is experiencing some level of drought, snowpack is at 70 percent of the long-term average and just 91 percent of last year’s total, Strobel said. Streamflow forecasts are poor and reservoir levels are low.

“We just don’t have the water in storage right now as we’re heading into the spring and summer, periods that are essential for agriculture and water management,” he said.

Those dry conditions and poor snowpack have also raised the risk that water levels could drop on the Mississippi River later this year, in a repeat of factors that reduced barge traffic last fall.
“We need rain in spring and fall so that we don’t have a crisis like we had this year on the Mississippi,” said Steve Buan from NOAA’s North Central River Forecast Center.

The portions of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa that funnel water into the Mississippi are “bone dry,” Buan said. NOAA estimates there is a 40 percent chance that come fall of 2013, the Mississippi River will dip as low, or lower, than during the record-breaking autumn last year.

The drought was most likely initially set into motion by the cooler-than-average water temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean, combined with the effects of warmer-than-average waters in the Atlantic Ocean. Studies have shown that this combination tends to favor major drought events in the U.S.

But some scientists, such as Nielsen-Gammon, suggest that the overall warmer climate created by manmade global warming may have amplified this already devastating drought, particularly by triggering more intense heat during the spring and summer of 2012.

A recently released draft of a new federal climate change assessment shows that as the climate continues to warm in the next few decades, drought events are likely to become more frequent and severe, leading to more significant water supply and agricultural impacts in much of the U.S

Escalating Costs

The continuing drought has already taken a toll on the nation’s farmers, said the USDA’s Rippey.
Drought during last year’s growing season took “major hits on row crops,” especially corn and sorghum, he said. Parched conditions reduced the nation’s production potential for those two crops by about one-quarter. Drought cut corn yields by 4 billion bushels and sorghum yields by 100 million bushels.

According to Climate Central research released on Feb. 18, the states of Missouri, Illinois and Indiana were among the hardest hit “Corn Belt” states, with yields at nearly 30-year lows.

The U.S. soybean crop rebounded slightly during a cooler, wetter August last year, though the overall yield still dropped by 200 million bushels, USDA found.

But heading into spring, it’s winter wheat that is the most immediate concern, Rippey said. In Oklahoma and South Dakota, roughly two-thirds of the current winter wheat crop is rated “poor” or “very poor,” while more than half of Texas’ crop falls into the same categories despite some rainfall this winter.

“We are at high risk for abandonment this year,” Rippey said, predicting that farmers could walk away from 25 percent or more of the nation’s winter wheat this year, the worst since 2002, unless their crops begin receiving steady, regular rains.

USDA won’t release its official estimates of crop production for 2013 until mid-May. But the agency is optimistic that U.S. corn will do well this year, yielding 163.5 bushels per acre. July weather will tell the tale, Rippey said, but encouraging signs include ebbing drought in the eastern half of the Corn Belt.

Another Destructive Wildfire Season Ahead?

It’s still too early to tell whether poor snowpack and persistent drought will yield another severe fire season in the western U.S., experts said.

Last year’s fires consumed many of the dead and damaged trees and underbrush that fuel wildfires, said Jim Douglas, a senior advisor at the Interior Department.

“If that fuel doesn’t regrow, it’s not there,” he said. “So we could have drought conditions with nothing to burn yet. And we could have a spring with early moisture, with a lot of grass growing good and tall. If it dries out in late summer, we could have very bad fire conditions.”

The National Interagency Fire Center projects an immediate above-average fire risk in regions hardest hit by drought in its Feb. 1 outlook, including portions of the Oklahoma Panhandle and eastern Colorado. But in the drought-stricken Rocky Mountains and Southwest, fire season normally doesn’t begin until April, the center said, and what it will look like isn’t yet clear.

– By Lauren Morello and Andrew Freedman

Friday, February 22, 2013

JMG Headline Of The Day :


 
Lesson learned. Never store ammo in the oven.

Reposted from Joe

Via Climate Prgress: 10 Ways The Sequester Will Expose Americans To Greater Health Risks And Other Perils

Posted: 22 Feb 2013 09:18 AM PST
Sequestration will have major—and negative—impacts on energy and environmental management agencies. Here’s how it will affect all Americans.
California wildfire
By Daniel J. Weiss, Michael Conathan, and Jessica Goad. Endnotes are in PDF version.
  1. More families exposed to the cold and heat
  2. Children and seniors more vulnerable to air pollution
  3. Less investment in clean drinking water and sewage treatment
  4. Families and businesses receiving less assistance after extreme weather events
  5. Less protection from wildfires
  6. Less accurate weather forecasting
  7. More dependence on foreign energy imports; more expensive clean energy
  8. Less oil and gas production from federal lands and waters
  9. National park closures and staff reductions
  10. More dangerous seas
“Beware the Ides of March” — Soothsayer, “Julius Caesar
The Ides of March falls on the 15th of March every year, but this year that fateful date and the impending doom it foretells could arrive two weeks early—on March 1, when $85 billion in automatic federal spending cuts are set to occur.

The so-called sequester will slash 5.3 percent in funding from every federal program except Social Security and Medicaid. For public health and clean energy programs, the sequester means less protection from air pollution and the health problems associated with it, less assistance after severe extreme weather events, more oil imports, fewer permits for oil and gas production on federal lands and waters, and reduced accessibility to our national parks. In short, it’s clear that sequestration will harm middle- and lower-income Americans.

1. More families exposed to the cold and heat

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, or LIHEAP, provided $3.4 billion in fiscal year 2012 to assist low-income seniors and other households with their heating and cooling bills. The National Energy Assistance Directors’ Association, which runs low-income energy assistance programs, reports that, “LIHEAP recipient households are likely to be vulnerable to temperature extremes” and that many of them have medical and other significant expenses.

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program provides aid to 8.9 million households, but “only 20 percent of the families eligible for assistance received LIHEAP aid,” according to a 2012 letter from 137 U.S. representatives to the House Appropriations Committee.

The sequester will axe an estimated $180 million in funding from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program. Since the average household received $450 from the program in 2011, this would mean preventing some 400,000 households from receiving aid from the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program.

The Weatherization Assistance Program helps to weatherize the homes of low-income families, making them more energy efficient and saving the typical household $400 in their annual heating and cooling costs. Moreover, the Department of Energy reports that:
Funding reductions under sequestration will reduce by more than a thousand the number of homes that would be weatherized in FY2013 and could result in the unemployment of 1,200 skilled weatherization professionals.

2. Children and seniors more vulnerable to air pollution

Sequestration will slash funds used to protect children, senior citizens, and those suffering from other respiratory or cardiac illnesses. These populations are most vulnerable to harm from smog, soot, mercury, and other hazardous pollutants that can lead to asthma attacks, respiratory ailments, learning impairment, and even premature death.

The Environmental Protection Agency warns that sequestration would harm vital programs that reduce air pollution by:

  • Reducing the funding that the Environmental Protection Agency provides to states to monitor air quality, forcing the shutdown of some critical air-monitoring sites. These monitoring sites provide essential data that is needed to reduce air pollution.
  • Cutting the number of “environmental cops” on the beat—the inspectors who enforce environmental laws. Enforcement is needed to protect the public from pollution levels that violate public health standards.
  • Lowering the number of inspections of power plants, oil refineries, and other major polluters to ensure that they comply with pollution limits. Sequestration could result in 1,000 fewer inspections of potential violators in 2013.
Harold Wimmer, president and CEO of the American Lung Association, noted that:
As a nation we’ve been making lifesaving progress in the fight against lung disease, but continued progress takes continued funding. Across-the-board cuts could stop this hard-earned progress in its tracks.

3. Less investment in clean drinking water and sewage treatment

The Safe Drinking Water Act and the Clean Water Act include revolving loan funds to help states finance drinking water purification and sewage treatment facilities—both of which are essential to the country’s public-health infrastructure. The Environmental Protection Agency reports that:
Reductions under sequestration would impact states’ ability to meet drinking water public health standards and to reduce the nitrogen and phosphorus pollution that contaminate drinking water supplies, cause toxic algae blooms, and deprive waters of oxygen that fish need to survive.
This reduction would result in the elimination of more than 100 water quality protection and restoration projects throughout the United States.
Drinking water and wastewater treatment are already badly underfunded. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that they have capital needs of at least $31.6 billion per year.

4. Families and businesses receiving less assistance after extreme weather events

There were 25 very severe climate-related droughts, floods, storms, wildfires, and heat waves in 2011 and 2012—extreme weather events that caused 1,100 fatalities and up to $188 billion in damage.
Sequestration will slash funds for both extreme-weather recovery efforts and future community-resilience efforts. Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano said in her testimony before the Senate on February 14, 2012, that:
Sequestration would reduce the Disaster Relief Fund … by over $1 billion, affecting survivors recovering from Hurricane Sandy, the tornadoes in Tuscaloosa and Joplin, and other major disasters across the Nation, as well as the economic recoveries of local economies in those regions.
Sequestration cuts could also require the [Federal Emergency Management Agency] to implement Immediate Needs Funding Restrictions late in the fiscal year during what is historically the season for tornados, wild fires, and hurricanes.
Like the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the Environmental Protection Agency reports that sequestration “would inhibit the development of techniques and procedures for communities to prepare for and recover from natural disasters and industrial accidents.”

5. Less protection from wildfires

The past two years saw record wildfire seasons across the United States. The National Climate Assessment draft report observes that, “increased warming, due to climate change, and drought have increased wildfires.” The U.S. Department of Agriculture, which includes the Forest Service, cautioned that sequestration will make it more difficult to fight fires:
This level of reduced funds would result in an appropriated funding level that is $42 million below the calculated 10-year average of fire suppression costs for FY 2013.
The agency would complete as many as 200,000 fewer acres of hazardous fuel treatments, resulting in an increased risk to communities from wildfires.

6. Less accurate weather forecasting

The future of accurate and advance forecasting of extreme weather events was already at risk before sequestration due to delays in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s satellite program that provides data to track storms. The New York Times reported in October 2012 that, “The United States is facing a year or more without crucial” polar-orbiting weather satellites. Sequestration could also add to this gap in weather-forecasting capability by further delaying the launch of replacements for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s aging geostationary satellites.

The Department of Commerce projects that sequestration will add an additional “2-3 year launch delay” for the next geostationary satellites, “which track severe weather events such as hurricanes and tornadoes.” It will also reduce flight hours for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s hurricane-prediction aircraft and cut maintenance and operations costs for ground-based weather radars and forecasting equipment. With climate change boosting the frequency and/or severity of storms, the last thing we should be doing is reducing our capacity to forecast them.

7. More dependence on foreign energy imports; more expensive clean energy

The United States has become more energy independent over the past four years, cutting oil imports from 57 percent to 42 percent between 2008 and 2012. Some of this progress could be undone if sequestration occurs. The Department of Energy warns:
Under sequestration, funding reductions would decelerate the Nation’s transition to a clean energy economy, and could weaken efforts to become more energy independent and energy secure.
A reduction in funding would slow down the significant advances made in making solar energy cost competitive with conventional forms of electricity generation, as well as cut funding for solar industry job training that is targeted at military veterans.
Meanwhile, China, Australia, and other nations continue to lower the cost of their solar electricity. Disinvesting in our efforts to lower solar costs will harm our economic competitiveness in this burgeoning industry.

8. Less oil and gas production from federal lands and waters

Two factors have contributed to lower oil imports: modern fuel economy standards that are reducing oil consumption and increased domestic oil production on private lands, federal lands, and federal waters that is replacing the need for foreign oil. But this domestic production from federal areas will slow if sequestration occurs. The Department of the Interior noted:
Efforts to expedite processing of offshore oil and gas permitting in the Gulf of Mexico would be thwarted by delays, putting at risk some of the [pending] 550 exploration plans.
Approximately 300 fewer onshore oil and gas leases would be issued in Western states such as Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, delaying prospective production from those lease tracts and deferring payments to the Treasury.
Since oil prices are set on a world market, the production of more domestic oil does not affect them. The Associated Press tested the theory that more U.S. drilling would lower gasoline prices, conducting an exhaustive analysis of 36 years of monthly U.S. oil production and gasoline price data. The Associated Press found “No statistical correlation between how much oil comes out of U.S. wells and the price at the pump.”

Having more domestic production—and fewer imports—improves our trade balance and keeps more of the money we spend on gasoline in the United States, where it can be recycled through the economy. Having fewer imports also reduces our reliance on oil from unstable regimes such as Nigeria and Venezuela.

9. National park closures and staff reductions

Sequester cuts will significantly impact America’s 398 national parks. The Department of Interior projects that, “the public should be prepared for reduced hours and services” at our national parks. Cuts could lead to closures of parts or all of certain parks, elimination of some park rangers, and fewer visitor services such as educational programs. As Maureen Finnerty, chairwoman of the Coalition of National Park Service Retirees, put it, “This is very troubling, and it has the potential to turn already budget-strapped national parks into ghost towns.”

Such funding losses will also reduce the national parks’ tremendous value as economic generators. In 2011 the country’s national parks stimulated $31 billion in economic activity and supported more than 258,000 jobs. The Department of Interior notes that, “local communities and business that rely on recreation to support their livelihoods would face a loss of income from reduced visitation to national parks.”

According to Greenwire, in January a leaked memo from the National Park Service suggested that in order to meet the budget demands of the sequester “the agency would need to slash $110 million from the $2.2 billion remaining in its budget over the next seven months.” The National Park Service’s analysis listed what the cuts will be to each national park if a 5 percent budget cut occurs across the board. The parks that would suffer from the largest cuts had nearly 76 million visits in 2012.


 

10. More dangerous seas

The U.S. Coast Guard is our nation’s first line of defense against maritime threats to our homeland security, a lifeline for mariners in distress, and among our key first responders when extreme weather strikes. Recall the heroics of Coast Guard rescuers who plucked thousands of people off rooftops following Hurricane Katrina and rescued 12 of 14 crew members from a tall ship that sank off the coast of North Carolina at the height of Hurricane Sandy.

Its operations are drastically underfunded, however, and its vessels are virtually obsolete. Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-NC), Chairman of the Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee, said in 2012 that even the pre-sequester Coast Guard budget “bluntly guts operational capabilities.” The Coast Guard reports, “With the average cutter age at 43 years, the HEC [High Endurance Cutter] fleet has become increasingly difficult to maintain and sustain operationally.”

In December 2012 the Coast Guard’s District 13 Commander in Seattle said that sequestration’s cuts would be “catastrophic” to his district’s operations. According to a letter to Congress from Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano, sequestration will curtail Coast Guard air and sea operations by as much as 25 percent, exposing America to a greater risk of maritime terrorist attacks and imperiling all Americans at sea.

Conclusion

The massive spending cuts mandated by the sequester reduce protection for children, seniors, and other vulnerable people; increase dependence on foreign oil; and impair some first responders to extreme weather. At the same time, it will leave untouched special tax breaks for the five biggest oil companies—BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, and Shell. These five companies, which made a combined $255 billion in profits over the past two years, will also continue to receive $2.4 billion annually from special tax breaks, according to the Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation. Something is wrong when heating assistance for low-income families and seniors is cut so that ExxonMobil can keep its tax breaks.

The looming budget sequester will harm American families and seniors and children in particular. The critical services provided by agencies that protect our air and drinking water, provide crucial aid after extreme weather, help those Americans who are least well off pay their energy bills, and protect our national parks require that Congress takes a balanced approach to reducing the federal budget deficit. Across-the-board budget cuts to these and other public health, energy, and environmental programs is not the solution.

Daniel J. Weiss is a Senior Fellow and the Director of Climate Strategy at the Center for American Progress. Michael Conathan is the Director of Ocean Policy at the Center. Jessica Goad is the Manager of Research and Outreach for the Center for American Progress’s Public Lands Project.

LATEST CANCER INFORMATION from Johns Hopkins

LATEST CANCER INFORMATION
from Johns Hopkins

AFTER YEARS OF TELLING PEOPLE CHEMOTHERAPY IS THE ONLY WAY TO TRY AND ELIMINATE CANCER, JOHNS HOPKINS IS FINALLY STARTING TO TELL YOU THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE WAY …


1. Every person has cancer cells in the body. These cancer cells do not show up in the standard tests until they have multiplied to a few billion. When doctors tell cancer patients that there are no more cancer cells in their bodies after treatment, it just means the tests are unable to detect the cancer cells because they have not reached the detectable size.

2. Cancer cells occur between 6 to more than 10 times in a person's lifetime.

3. When the person's immune system is strong the cancer cells will be destroyed and prevented from multiplying and forming tumors.

4. When a person has cancer it indicates the person has multiple nutritional deficiencies. These could be due to genetic, environmental, food and lifestyle factors.

5. To overcome the multiple nutritional deficiencies, changing diet and including supplements will strengthen the immune system.

6. Chemotherapy involves poisoning the rapidly-growing cancer cells and also destroys rapidly-growing healthy cells in the bone marrow, gastro-intestinal tract etc, and can cause organ damage, like liver, kidneys, heart, lungs etc.

7. Radiation while destroying cancer cells also burns, scars and damages healthy cells, tissues and organs.

8. Initial treatment with chemotherapy and radiation will often reduce tumor size. However prolonged use of chemotherapy and radiation do not result in more tumor destruction.

9. When the body has too much toxic burden from chemotherapy and radiation the immune system is either compromised or destroyed, hence the person can succumb to various kinds of infections and complications.

10. Chemotherapy and radiation can cause cancer cells to mutate and become resistant and difficult to destroy. Surgery can also cause cancer cells to spread to other sites.


11. An effective way to battle cancer is to STARVE the cancer cells by not feeding it with foods it needs to multiple.

What cancer cells feed on:

a. Sugar is a cancer-feeder. By cutting off sugar it cuts off one important food supply to the cancer cells. Note: Sugar substitutes like NutraSweet, Equal, Spoonful, etc are made with Aspartame and it is harmful. A better natural substitute would be Manuka honey or molasses but only in very small amounts. Table salt has a chemical added to make it white in colour. Better alternative is Bragg's aminos or sea salt.


b. Milk causes the body to produce mucus, especially in the gastro-intestinal tract. Cancer feeds on mucus. By cutting off milk and substituting with unsweetened soy milk, cancer cells will starved.

c. Cancer cells thrive in an acid environment. A meat-based diet is acidic and it is best to eat fish, and a little chicken rather than beef or pork. Meat also contains livestock antibiotics, growth hormones and parasites, which are all harmful, especially to people with cancer.

d. A diet made of 80% fresh vegetables and juice, whole grains, seeds, nuts and a little fruits help put the body into an alkaline environment. About 20% can be from cooked food including beans. Fresh vegetable juices provide live enzymes that are easily absorbed and reach down to cellular levels within 15 minutes t o nourish and enhance growth of healthy cells.

To obtain live enzymes for building healthy cells try and drink fresh vegetable juice (most vegetables including bean sprouts) and eat some raw vegetables 2 or 3 times a day. Enzymes are destroyed at temperatures of 104 degrees F (40 degrees C).

e. Avoid coffee, tea, and chocolate, which have high caffeine. Green tea is a better alternative and has cancer-fighting properties. Water--best to drink purified water, or filtered, to avoid known toxins and heavy metals in tap water. Distilled water is acidic, avoid it.

12. Meat protein is difficult to digest and requires a lot of digestive enzymes. Undigested meat remaining in the intestines will become putrified and leads to more toxic buildup.

13. Cancer cell walls have a tough protein covering. By refraining from or eating less meat it frees more enzymes to attack the protein walls of cancer cells and allows the body's killer cells to destroy the cancer cells.

14. Some supplements build up the immune system (IP6, Flor-ssence, Essiac, anti-oxidants, vitamins, minerals, EFAs etc.) to enable the body's own killer cells to destroy cancer cells. Other supplements like vitamin E are known to cause apoptosis, or programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.

15. Cancer is a disease of the mind, body, and spirit. A proactive and positive spirit will help the cancer warrior be a survivor.

Anger, unforgiving and bitterness put the body into a stressful and acidic environment. Learn to have a loving and forgiving spirit. Learn to relax and enjoy life.

16. Cancer cells cannot thrive in an oxygenated environment. Exercising daily, and deep breathing help to get more oxygen down to the cellular level. Oxygen therapy is another means employed to destroy cancer cells.

(PLEASE SHARE IT TO PEOPLE YOU CARE ABOUT)LATEST CANCER INFORMATION
from Johns Hopkins

AFTER YEARS OF TELLING PEOPLE CHEMOTHERAPY IS THE ONLY WAY TO TRY AND ELIMINATE CANCER, JOHNS HOPKINS IS FINALLY STARTING TO TELL YOU THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE WAY …


1. Every person has cancer cells in the body. These cancer cells do not show up in the standard tests until they have multiplied to a few billion. When doctors tell cancer patients that there are no more cancer cells in their bodies after treatment, it just means the tests are unable to detect the cancer cells because they have not reached the detectable size.

2. Cancer cells occur between 6 to more than 10 times in a person's lifetime.

3. When the person's immune system is strong the cancer cells will be destroyed and prevented from multiplying and forming tumors.

4. When a person has cancer it indicates the person has multiple nutritional deficiencies. These could be due to genetic, environmental, food and lifestyle factors.

5. To overcome the multiple nutritional deficiencies, changing diet and including supplements will strengthen the immune system.

6. Chemotherapy involves poisoning the rapidly-growing cancer cells and also destroys rapidly-growing healthy cells in the bone marrow, gastro-intestinal tract etc, and can cause organ damage, like liver, kidneys, heart, lungs etc.

7. Radiation while destroying cancer cells also burns, scars and damages healthy cells, tissues and organs.

8. Initial treatment with chemotherapy and radiation will often reduce tumor size. However prolonged use of chemotherapy and radiation do not result in more tumor destruction.

9. When the body has too much toxic burden from chemotherapy and radiation the immune system is either compromised or destroyed, hence the person can succumb to various kinds of infections and complications.

10. Chemotherapy and radiation can cause cancer cells to mutate and become resistant and difficult to destroy. Surgery can also cause cancer cells to spread to other sites.


11. An effective way to battle cancer is to STARVE the cancer cells by not feeding it with foods it needs to multiple.

What cancer cells feed on:

a. Sugar is a cancer-feeder. By cutting off sugar it cuts off one important food supply to the cancer cells. Note: Sugar substitutes like NutraSweet, Equal, Spoonful, etc are made with Aspartame and it is harmful. A better natural substitute would be Manuka honey or molasses but only in very small amounts. Table salt has a chemical added to make it white in colour. Better alternative is Bragg's aminos or sea salt.


b. Milk causes the body to produce mucus, especially in the gastro-intestinal tract. Cancer feeds on mucus. By cutting off milk and substituting with unsweetened soy milk, cancer cells will starved.

c. Cancer cells thrive in an acid environment. A meat-based diet is acidic and it is best to eat fish, and a little chicken rather than beef or pork. Meat also contains livestock antibiotics, growth hormones and parasites, which are all harmful, especially to people with cancer.

d. A diet made of 80% fresh vegetables and juice, whole grains, seeds, nuts and a little fruits help put the body into an alkaline environment. About 20% can be from cooked food including beans. Fresh vegetable juices provide live enzymes that are easily absorbed and reach down to cellular levels within 15 minutes t o nourish and enhance growth of healthy cells.

To obtain live enzymes for building healthy cells try and drink fresh vegetable juice (most vegetables including bean sprouts) and eat some raw vegetables 2 or 3 times a day. Enzymes are destroyed at temperatures of 104 degrees F (40 degrees C).

e. Avoid coffee, tea, and chocolate, which have high caffeine. Green tea is a better alternative and has cancer-fighting properties. Water--best to drink purified water, or filtered, to avoid known toxins and heavy metals in tap water. Distilled water is acidic, avoid it.

12. Meat protein is difficult to digest and requires a lot of digestive enzymes. Undigested meat remaining in the intestines will become putrified and leads to more toxic buildup.

13. Cancer cell walls have a tough protein covering. By refraining from or eating less meat it frees more enzymes to attack the protein walls of cancer cells and allows the body's killer cells to destroy the cancer cells.

14. Some supplements build up the immune system (IP6, Flor-ssence, Essiac, anti-oxidants, vitamins, minerals, EFAs etc.) to enable the body's own killer cells to destroy cancer cells. Other supplements like vitamin E are known to cause apoptosis, or programmed cell death, the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.

15. Cancer is a disease of the mind, body, and spirit. A proactive and positive spirit will help the cancer warrior be a survivor.

Anger, unforgiving and bitterness put the body into a stressful and acidic environment. Learn to have a loving and forgiving spirit. Learn to relax and enjoy life.

16. Cancer cells cannot thrive in an oxygenated environment. Exercising daily, and deep breathing help to get more oxygen down to the cellular level. Oxygen therapy is another means employed to destroy cancer cells.

(PLEASE SHARE IT TO PEOPLE YOU CARE ABOUT)

Sunday, February 17, 2013

Via JMG: TEXAS: State GOP Rep Proposes Training High School Students To Use Guns


Texas GOP state Rep. James White has introduced a bill that would allow public schools to offer an elective course on the use of firearms.
HB 1142 would include training in the use of firearms including rifles, shotguns, pistols and revolvers. "Education, foremost, as stated in our Constitution, is about teaching our people their rights and responsibilities as a free people," said White, who emphasizes that the most important component of the class would be teaching students the history and importance of the Second Amendment.
"I have a lot of confidence in our young people," said White, who argues such a course would be no more dangerous than activities already offered in many high schools. "You could go to any high school today and you'll see them engaging in many what we would consider probably dangerous activities: Welding, auto mechanic, weight lifting, playing sports. So our students are not these little fragile beings. They're very knowledgeable, they're very resilient and they can handle this."
What could possibly go wrong?

Labels: , , ,

Reposted from Joe

Via Republican Bigotry Hate Fear Lies and Distortion / FB:


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